Technology

Jun 01, 2005
Pharmaceutical Executive
Even though data can single out physicians with high marketing upsides, most pharma companies are doing without such high-value data.
Jun 01, 2005
Pharmaceutical Executive
CMS envisions studies to show which drugs keep patients out of hospitals or how certain treatments can reduce side effects. Such analysis would support decisions on best practices in using medications.
Jun 01, 2005
Pharmaceutical Executive
Electronic patient-reported outcomes tools let trial sponsors enforce recording deadlines and compliance. They help keep subjects honest.
Jun 01, 2005
Pharmaceutical Executive
Pharma companies are committed to using electronic data capture in clinical trials. Technology adoption will continue to grow, as FDA and consumers want faster safety data.
May 01, 2005
Pharmaceutical Executive
Having an efficient, integrated call center can be a matter of life or death. Imagine a pharma company not knowing for several weeks that the active ingredient in a life-saving drug was left out of the final product? How would they learn of the error if the quality control at the manufacturing plant failed to identify the problem? Most likely, the next opportunity for identifying such a crisis is through the call center—the key interface between healthcare professionals, consumers, and the company. However, it's not enough to log complaints about a product's efficacy. Once documented, complaints need to be routed to the right department, evaluated, and consolidated. If a streamlined process isn't in place, weeks could pass without anyone ever taking any action—even as adverse event records pile up.
May 01, 2005
Pharmaceutical Executive
By Pharmaceutical Executive Editors
In a non-human primate study, high doses of Neumune resulted in 90 percent survival against a lethal level of radiation.
May 01, 2005
Pharmaceutical Executive
The future of US healthcare is being created today in Medicare's demonstration programs. But how you respond to them depends a lot on what kind of company you are.
Mar 01, 2005
Pharmaceutical Executive
In an ideal world, an anti-counterfeit solution would provide protection throughout the supply chain, allow for easy product identification by physicians, pharmacists, and patients, be easily implemented without ongoing costs—and improve brand image and marketability while it's at it. Yet most current anti-counterfeiting measures involve packaging technologies such as holograms, inks, bar codes and radio frequency ID (RFID) that, although useful, cannot ensure the integrity of the pharmaceutical supply chain, because drugs do not remain in their original packaging. Legitimate repackaging regularly occurs in the pharmacy and elsewhere, and authentic packaging—recycled or stolen—can contain adulterated, counterfeited drugs.
Mar 01, 2005
Pharmaceutical Executive
By Pharmaceutical Executive Editors
The use of a CUI leads development efforts to explre the most valuable region of treatment — not necessarily the the most efficacious.
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