News Update

Jun 01, 2002
Pharmaceutical Executive
Terminally ill patients often wonder about the roles of timing and fate in determining their life's course. If only they had been tested or diagnosed earlier; if only the doctors had found the tumor before it metastasized. As purveyors of science and administrators of public health, the world's pharma companies and physicians struggle to intervene earlier-indeed to predict and prevent disease-before it's too late.
Jun 01, 2002
Pharmaceutical Executive
Despite generics' increasing market share and the slowed pace of blockbuster discoveries, the industry has reason for optimism. A recent IMS World Review report shows that audited global pharmaceutical sales grew 12 percent in 2001.
Jun 01, 2002
Pharmaceutical Executive
For companies producing contraceptives, April brought good news and bad news. The good news for Schering AG is that the UK anti-abortion group, the Society for the Protection of Unborn Children, lost its latest legal battle to stop over-the-counter sales of the company's "morning after" pill. SPUC claims that Schering's Levonelle (levonorgestrel) is not a contraceptive but an abortifacient and, therefore, should not be taken without the written consent of two doctors. Levonelle has been available in the United Kingdom without a prescription since December 2000.
May 01, 2002
Pharmaceutical Executive
After three successive blows, Wall Street analysts say BMS, the fifth largest global pharma company, could be a takeover target. First came FDA's refusal to review the data for Erbitux (IMS 255), BMS and ImClone's joint cancer treatment candidate in which BMS has invested more than a billion dollars. Two months later, the company announced that next year's earnings might be only half that of this year. Disappointed stockholders unloaded in droves, driving the price down nearly 15 percent. And to top it off, the board of directors has put CEO Peter Dolan on notice: one more stumble and he's
May 01, 2002
Pharmaceutical Executive
Products in Trouble
May 01, 2002
Pharmaceutical Executive
As the fanfare over the sequencing of the human genome fades, the spotlight turns to the "shovel and pans" companies offering the tools investors are betting on to make "gene to drug" a reality.
May 01, 2002
Pharmaceutical Executive
Kiln, a Lloyds of London underwriter, has come up with a novel way for pharma companies to mitigate the risk of patent challenges: insurance. Kiln created a policy for a big pharma company covering a number of patents and trademarks the company considers essential for its future profitability.
May 01, 2002
Pharmaceutical Executive
The European Medicines Evaluation Agency (EMEA) has promised to get tough with pharma companies if they fail to follow its rules for reporting product side effects. It may resort to naming and shaming those that do not comply and could even prosecute offenders.
May 01, 2002
Pharmaceutical Executive
Because of the European Union's country-by-country drug price controls, enterprising wholesalers often buy prescription drugs in nations that keep prices low and resell them in countries that allow higher prices. Sanofi-Synthelabo's Plavix costs $55 in France but is resold for $79 in England. That long-standing practice, known as parallel trade, costs the pharma industry an estimated $3 billion in lost profits each year.
May 01, 2002
Pharmaceutical Executive
A flood of counterfeit medications into the Nigerian market is causing great concern among the nation's regulatory authorities, according to a British Medical Journal report. Many fakes may contain a small amount of the active ingredient but not enough to make them therapeutically useful. Under-strength antibiotics represent a significant public health problem, as the inadvertent administration of them can lead to bacterial resistance.
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