News Update

Sep 01, 2001
Pharmaceutical Executive
London-Schering and Biogen have both expressed anger over the leak of a National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE) document suggesting that doctors stop prescribing beta-interferon to new multiple sclerosis (MS) patients.
Aug 01, 2001
Pharmaceutical Executive
London/Sodertalje—AstraZeneca’s decision to drop Viozan (AR-C68397AA) for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) could be GlaxoSmithKline’s gain.
Aug 01, 2001
Pharmaceutical Executive
Lucerne, Switzerland-At the European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industries Associations’ (EFPIA) recent annual meeting, new president Jean-Francois Dehecq reiterated the association’s view that no single factor prevents access to essential medicines in developing countries.
Aug 01, 2001
Pharmaceutical Executive
Brussels-Lack of intellectual property protection is not causing the erosion of European pharma, reports the European Generics Association.
Aug 01, 2001
Pharmaceutical Executive
London-GlaxoSmithKline is proposing to cut more than 2,000 jobs from its worldwide workforce of 100,000 as it seeks to generate the promised savings from its merger.
Aug 01, 2001
Pharmaceutical Executive
Singapore—Lilly’s decision to set up a Singapore R&D center to focus on systems biology is the latest in a series of moves that have put the Far East island on the biotech map.
Jul 01, 2001
Pharmaceutical Executive
Epsom, Surrey, United Kingdom—Pharmaceutical companies struggle to be taken seriously when they talk of facing pressures. A quick look at the bottom line often suggests they are overstating their worries. But new evidence shows they are being squeezed by generic competition and falling R&D output.
Jul 01, 2001
Pharmaceutical Executive
European Union-The European Commission’s ban on GlaxoSmith–Kline’s dual pricing policy in Spain halts one of Big Pharma’s attempts to prevent parallel imports in Europe.
Jul 01, 2001
Pharmaceutical Executive
Basel, Switzerland—Roche, which recently slashed its work force by 3,000, maintains that it will remain independent even after the sale of 20 percent of the company to Novartis. Franz Humer, the troubled company’s chairman, says the founding family supports Roche’s strategy.
Jul 01, 2001
Pharmaceutical Executive
Basel, Switzerland -Novartis plans to provide its malaria drug, Coartem (artemether/lumefantrin), at cost to developing countries in partnership with the World Health Organization (WHO). The effort is only the latest in a series of moves intended to increase access to essential medicines after Big Pharma’s South Africa debacle.
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