PE Features - Pharmaceutical Executive

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PE Features

More Than Just a Pretty Color

March 1, 2005

In an ideal world, an anti-counterfeit solution would provide protection throughout the supply chain, allow for easy product identification by physicians, pharmacists, and patients, be easily implemented without ongoing costs—and improve brand image and marketability while it's at it. Yet most current anti-counterfeiting measures involve packaging technologies such as holograms, inks, bar codes and radio frequency ID (RFID) that, although useful, cannot ensure the integrity of the pharmaceutical supply chain, because drugs do not remain in their original packaging. Legitimate repackaging regularly occurs in the pharmacy and elsewhere, and authentic packaging—recycled or stolen—can contain adulterated, counterfeited drugs.

AIDS in Africa: The Road Forward

March 1, 2005

If the Aspen model works, it could change the model for the developing world. Research-based companies could focus on R&D, and leave the manufacturing to generic companies.

Transparent Trade-Offs

March 1, 2005

The use of a CUI leads development efforts to explre the most valuable region of treatment — not necessarily the the most efficacious.

Bridging the Gap

February 1, 2005

An effective, high-performing alliance can generate a stronger bottom line outcome.

The Sampling Subsidy

February 1, 2005

Physicians give only 25 percent of samples to newly diagnosed patients, along with a prescription.

Medicare: D Day

February 1, 2005

For companies that are prepared, Part D represents a great opportunity. For others, failing to react quickly enough could be a costly mistake.

The Rise and Fall of Pharma Reputations

February 1, 2005

As a reputation driver, ethical behavior has increased steadily in importance over the last three years.

AIDS IN AFRICA: The Lazarus Effect

February 1, 2005

For Africa's 25 million AIDS patients, the difference between death and life is drugs. But how do pharma's products get from the world's wealthiest companies to patients at the heart of the world's biggest health disaster? Joanna Breitstein went to Uganda to find out.

The Future of Labeling

January 1, 2005

Say good bye to PDF and Word files. Over the next few years, FDA and European regulators will require regulatory submissions in new XML-based formats. The change will be a challenge for companies—but it offers many rewards. // The first hurdle: The Structured Product Labeling Initiative. Here's what you need to know.

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