Articles by Tim Kelly - Pharmaceutical Executive

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Articles by Tim Kelly

Knowledge-Based Outsourcing: Driving Deeper Insights

Tracking, monitoring, and trend evaluation based on predictive modeling and forecasting is not enough. Companies must now do more than assess what happened and why. Enter actionable analyticsa way of making information-intensive processes more efficient
Oct 1, 2010

Tracking, monitoring, and trend evaluation is not enough. Companies must now do more than assess what happened and why.

DTC Grows Up

Oct 15, 2007

With Exprience and A new means of measuring impact on patient behavior, branders have never been in a better position to make their strategies work

Get a Grip on the Supply Chain

Sarbanes-Oxley revenue-recognition compliance is reducing perfectly competent execs to complete blubber. Here's help in figuring out when a sale is really a sale.
Apr 1, 2007

The Sarbanes-Oxley Act—or SOX, as it is dubbed (not always so affectionately)—requires companies to provide greater control and quality assurance across a vast spectrum of business processes. In practice, SOX plays out differently industry by industry and even company by company. But for pharma, one of the most pressing consequences is the need to improve the accuracy of revenue recognition.

Missing the Mark(et)

Pharma spends billions on data. Sales reps crowd the waiting rooms. So why is the doctor out?
Sep 1, 2005

If pharmaceutical companies hope to improve their marketing efficiency, they have to change how they approach their customers. For years, manufacturers have been practicing the "more is better" direct-selling approach to physicians. But research now shows what common sense has long suggested: More has become too much. Education has given way to inundation, clamoring for face time with physicians has led to diminishing sales returns, and relationships with major pharma stakeholders have broken down. Physicians, regulators, consumers, and legislators have come to mistrust manufacturers' motives and integrity. As pharma asks how its marketing strategies have missed the mark, it may discover answers in reinventing something it once relied upon: strong relationships with customers.

Missing the Mark(et)

Pharma spends billions on data. Sales reps crowd the waiting rooms. So why is the doctor out?
Sep 1, 2005

If pharmaceutical companies hope to improve their marketing efficiency, they have to change how they approach their customers. For years, manufacturers have been practicing the "more is better" direct-selling approach to physicians. But research now shows what common sense has long suggested: More has become too much. Education has given way to inundation, clamoring for face time with physicians has led to diminishing sales returns, and relationships with major pharma stakeholders have broken down. Physicians, regulators, consumers, and legislators have come to mistrust manufacturers' motives and integrity. As pharma asks how its marketing strategies have missed the mark, it may discover answers in reinventing something it once relied upon: strong relationships with customers.

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