Articles by Ron Feemster - Pharmaceutical Executive

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Articles by Ron Feemster

Ron Feemster


Articles
From Promise to Payoff
December 1, 2009

Our sixth annual pipeline report details 44 drugs that industry will be talking about in 2010.

One Pill Makes You Small
September 1, 2009

The obesity pipeline, despite a hugely underserved market potentially worth $11 billion, is awfully thin.

The 2008 Pipeline Report
December 1, 2008

We scrub industry's pipeline to find the drugs that everyone will be talking about in 2009 and beyond

Jeffrey Kindler: In His Own Words
August 2, 2006

Pfizer's new CEO shares his views on a range of hot topics, from sales and marketing to regulation, compliance, and corporate culture.

FDA Raises the Stakes
July 1, 2006

RFID is not ready for prime time anywhere. Certainly not in the US. There is no way RFID gives you end-to-end control of the product.

Back Page: Soft Serve, Hard Lessons
July 1, 2006

At first glance, you might think Bob Miglani comes from a pharma family. He and both of his younger sisters began their careers as sales reps after college. But behind their success in big business lie formative experiences at the Dairy Queen stores owned by their uncle and parents, who are immigrants from India. Even today, Miglani, whose fulltime job is in Pfizer's public affairs department, spends some weekends serving cones at the family business. In his new book, Treat Your Customers: Thirty Lessons on Service and Sales That I Learned at My Family's Dairy Queen Store (Hyperion, 2006), Miglani, 36, shares the core values that work in small business and corporate America.

Good Counsel
July 1, 2006

Jeffrey Kindler holds two blue, diamond-shaped pills in the palm of his hand. One is authentic Viagra, manufactured by Pfizer. The other is counterfeit, maybe bought by an undercover Pfizer investigator, or intercepted when smugglers crossed a border, or perhaps seized in a raid on an illegal Chinese factory. Kindler challenges visitors and fellow employees to tell the difference between the two pills. Neither looks in any obvious way "fake," and no one among the journalists, corporate communications employees, or even security specialists gathered in Pfizer's global security operations center cares to hazard a guess.

Watching the Supply Chain
May 10, 2006

How can FDA track billions of prescription drugs from manufacturer to patient? Paul Chang, leader of IBM?s RFID program, imagines a thin database in the sky.

Teamsters v. Pfizer
May 1, 2006

The world's largest drug manufacturer must answer off-label promotion charges brought by a new adversary. Not FDA, with its warning letters and threats of marketing sanctions, and not the Office of the Inspector General (OIG) at Health and Human Services, which often sues for fraud, forces huge settlements, and requires companies to do business under restrictive corporate integrity agreements. Instead, the company faces a class-action civil suit from insurance companies and union welfare funds, groups that, until recently, Pfizer regarded primarily as customers—or at least people who picked up the tab for customers. Now, led by the Welfare Fund of a Teamsters local from New Jersey, third-party payers are suing under RICO, the Racketeering Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act. If their suit is successful, payers who have covered billions of dollars worth of Lipitor (atorvastatin) over the past five years will receive treble damages for the cost of off-label prescriptions. The suit may also attract..

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