Pharmaceutical Executive, Oct 1, 2012 - Pharmaceutical Executive

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Pharmaceutical Executive, Oct 1, 2012
Features
Richard Bergström — Europe's Medicine Man
By Peter O'Donnell
The new head of EFPIA faces a Promethean challenge: selling the merits of costly science and innovation in an era of bristling competition, fiscal crisis, and declining demographics.
Lundbeck: Bidding for the Stars and Stripes
By William Looney
Pharm Exec takes a look at how a mid tier player — Denmark's Lundbeck — is counting on the momentum of the big US market to vault it to global leadership position.
Stem Cells: A Promise Deferred?
By Ben Comer
Ideology, politics, and a stilted political debate may be causing pharma to overlook the potential of emerging stem cell therapies in fostering a new generation of cures.
Country Report
Country Report: Turkey
In the global theater of business and politics, Turkey increasingly leverages its location as an ideal vantage point where actors can seamlessly move between all things West and East.
Column
Reforming Pharma Marketing
With respect to targeting, positioning, and launching new drugs, the ACA reform stands for Adjust, Change, and Adapt.
Complex Drugs and Biologics: Policy Considerations in Brazil
The Brazilian government's policy on biologics doesn't adequately address non-biologic complex drugs. Additional guidance is needed to bring these important medicines to market.
The Drug Vote 2012
By Ben Comer
A comparative effectiveness study on the two presidential candidates.
Latest Changes and Challenges at FDA
By Jill Wechsler
New user fee programs precipitate major changes at an agency under constant and intense scrutiny, writes Jill Wechsler.
Defensible Data Disposal
With the costs of data storage poised to increase, pharmaceutical companies need to break their pack rat mentality with respect to data, writes Lorrie Luellig.
Your Local Competitor: A Threat in Emerging Markets?
Pharmaceutical companies looking to wrest market share in high growth markets of tomorrow must overcome challenges from a new crop of national champions.
From the Editor
Three Ways to the Future
By William Looney
Developing a drug is still very much a game of chance: a round puzzle of soft edges, with pieces that rarely fit the hard rectangles of time and money. Solving the puzzle correctly—with a new product as the sum of its parts—depends on making that lengthy progression from basic science to registration as linear as possible.

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