Pharmaceutical Executive, Mar 1, 2005 - Pharmaceutical Executive

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Pharmaceutical Executive, Mar 1, 2005
Features
More Than Just a Pretty Color
By David R. Schoneker
In an ideal world, an anti-counterfeit solution would provide protection throughout the supply chain, allow for easy product identification by physicians, pharmacists, and patients, be easily implemented without ongoing costs—and improve brand image and marketability while it's at it. Yet most current anti-counterfeiting measures involve packaging technologies such as holograms, inks, bar codes and radio frequency ID (RFID) that, although useful, cannot ensure the integrity of the pharmaceutical supply chain, because drugs do not remain in their original packaging. Legitimate repackaging regularly occurs in the pharmacy and elsewhere, and authentic packaging—recycled or stolen—can contain adulterated, counterfeited drugs.
Transparent Trade-Offs
By Bob Korsan , Kevin Dykstra , Dr. William Pullman
The use of a CUI leads development efforts to explre the most valuable region of treatment — not necessarily the the most efficacious.
Columns
Sales Management: Starting from Zero
By S. Kent Stephan
Pharma companies allocate sales calls to doctors based on historic prescribing patterns. Heavy prescribers attract more calls, sometimes in proportion to volume. There's a problem with that practice...
Back Page: States Won't Wait for Feds
By Noah Shannon , Judith Braun-Davis
In 2002 it was the PhRMA Code, in 2003 it was the OIG's Guidance for Industry, and in 2004 it was Justice Department enforcement. Now, in 2005, it appears that regulation of the US pharma industry has a new focal point—state legislatures.
Marketing to Professionals: Marketing to Go
By Rich Levy
Outsourcing is common among start-ups, with limited income to invest in marketing. It makes sense for larger companies with products that lack blockbuster potential.
Alternative Media: Opt-in to Opt-out
The CAN-SPAM (Controlling the Assault of Non-Solicited Pornography and Marketing) Act of 2003 was supposed to level the playing field for pharma marketers. Industry hoped that the legislation, which allows affected parties to bring lawsuits against spammers, would clear the clutter from customers' inboxes so that they would be more receptive to pharma's e-mail messages.
Thought Leaders: Tapping the Free Flow of FDA Information
The Freedom of Information Act is a lousy way to research a company's pipeline because FDA regards drug development as a trade secret.
Direct to Consumer: Payers as Partners
By Lisa B. Bair
Brand managers and managed markets have many common goals, such as increasing consumers' understanding of treatment options. These shared goals create the opportunity for partnerships.
Public Relations: It's Your Day (or Month)
By Megan Svenson
It's possible to ride an event's coattails, but for better results, partner with the non-profit sponsor.
Legal Forum: Patents Pending
By Nagendra Setty
There is a strong sentiment that the new legislation was aimed primarily to please the West, and it went further than it had to, failing to take advantage of carve-outs other developing nations have employed.
World News
Global Report
By Sarah Houlton
Pharma companies in Europe believe that it already takes too long for new medicines to reach patients. Separate bodies for efficacy and safety will lead to further delays.
From the Editor
From the Editor
By Patrick Clinton
In the drug safety debate, we're hearing plenty of potential solutions. They're smart and advance desirable goals. There's just one thing wrong with them: They don't solve the problem.
Special Reports
AIDS in Africa: The Road Forward
By Joanna Breitstein
If the Aspen model works, it could change the model for the developing world. Research-based companies could focus on R&D, and leave the manufacturing to generic companies.
Executive Profile
Pharma's New Face
By Patrick Clinton , Jill Wechsler
We accept risk in every phase of our lives except drugs. There is a lot of risk to open-heart surgery. But I don’t hear anyone saying we need to stop doing it.
Washington Report
Washington Report: The Main Event Begins
By Jill Wechsler
Should policy makers expect 90 percent of seniors to enroll in PDPs, or will 75 percent be enough? Will the program have to keep costs down to $400 billion a year, or will spending be linked to savings elsewhere?

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