Pharmaceutical Executive, Apr 1, 2005 - Pharmaceutical Executive

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Pharmaceutical Executive, Apr 1, 2005
Features
Good News Bad News
By Stephen J. Porth , George P. Sillup
The majority of headlines opposed the industry: 57.1 percent were negative, 18.1 percent were positive, and 24.8 percent were neutral. But the headlines were less negative than the stories themselves.
MVPs
By William Roite , Daniel Williams
MVPs go beyond numbers to create extraordinary value for companies and their stockholders. They are the top two to five percent of employees. In other words, if you were to lose 100 people, which two to five would you protect at all costs?
Keys to Success
By Michael Curran-Hays , Martin Wing
Johnson & Johnson's pharmaceutical group builds team and relationship skills into performance evaluations. J&J's Robert Wills says, "Such skills are a built-in expectation. It's how people are supposed to do their job. Everyone who participates in an alliance is compensated for behaviors that contribute to mutual success."
Risky Business
By Anthony Farino , Timothy Nugent , John T. Bentivoglio , John Shakow
Every quarter, pharmaceutical manufacturers confront a dizzying array of price reporting obligations. Participation in the Medicare, Medicaid, Veterans Administration (VA), and Public Health Service (PHS) programs requires manufacturers to collect, organize, distill and manipulate vast quantities of information, and to generate from that data reportable figures that can have an enormous impact on the company's bottom line. It is critical that these figures be correct, not only to help ensure the integrity of these public programs, but because submission of false data to a federal agency is a prosecutable criminal offense, and the civil penalties and exposure can be staggering.
Patent Attack
By Gregory Glass
Contrary to myth, Paragraph IV certifications are not reserved only for blockbusters or high-volume primary care products. Three products under recent Paragraph IV challenges had sales of less than $50 million.
Columns
Marketing to Professionals: The Good and the Bad
By Willow Duttge
Companies should balance the public's need to know with the industry's right to keep strategic intelligence private.
Newer Not Always Better
By David Blumberg
Developing first-in-class therapies is riskier and more labor intensive than filling pipelines with successor drugs. Can innovation remain the cornerstone of an industry reliant on "me toos"?
Meetings: Overall Improvement
By Cindy D'Aoust
You would think that identifying where a pharma company spends its money on meetings would be simple, but at most organizations, there are no processes or systems in place to track meeting activity.
Leadership: Listen Up Leaders: Get Out of the Way!
By Sander A. Flaum
Creativity that spawns innovation transcends the daily workplace grind and shows up in unexpected areas.
Educational Exchange
By Barbara Lockee , Michelle Reece
Institutions bring value to industry not only through shared coursework or customized training programs, but also through leveraging the intellectual property of institutional personnel for corporate problem solving.
Is There Life After Big Pharma?
By Stephen Israel
You can have a biotech company with a great technology base, but if it doesn't have a product in Phase II development, Wall Street won't reward the company by increasing the value of its stock price. When products are valued over technology, there is a higher premium for commercially-focused business leaders.
Direct to Consumer: Is Branding Enough?
By Amy Lynn Tobbagi
You couldn't have missed Viagra's (sildenafil) "Devi" campaign. It's the one where the "V" in the Viagra logo turns into a pair of devil"s horns atop a middle-aged man's head. Well, FDA didn"t miss it either. Back in November 2004, the agency sent Pfizer a warning letter stating that its reminder ads for Viagra lacked risk information.
The Business Case for Diversity
By Sibyl Shalo
For the third year in a row, Abbott Labs has made it into the top 10 companies judged by DiversityInc magazine to have the most diverse workforce. According to DiversityInc co-founder Luke Visconti, that makes Abbott, number five in the ranking, extraordinary. Merck is the only other pharma company to make the cut, but comes in at number 24, and is on a downturn—it was ranked 13 last year.
Alternative Media: Cautious Integration
By Paul Buta , Tina Jacobs
Unsolicited bulk e-mail is competing with the messages that companies are sending. More than 80 percent of consumers deal with their cluttered inboxes by deleting all messages from people they don't know.
Candidate Care: A Competitive Advantage
By Robert Hennessy
World-class talent seeks its own level, so hiring companies should make sure that those involved in the interviewing process are strong employees who represent the company as leaders in their own rights.
Confessions of A Corporate Headhunter
By Denise DeMan Williams
It is unethical for a retained search firm to fill one client's needs by poaching people from another client that entrusts the firm with its searches and secrets. Partnering—and sharing fees—might be the solution.
Washington Report
Washington Report: The Little Fix
By Jill Wechsler
Reformers want to give FDA more clout, but agency officials say internal changes will help fix drug safety problems.
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OVERVIEW
From the Editor
Building a World-Class Workforce
By Sibyl Shalo
Job candidates that evangelize a company are worth more than PR campaigns.
The Problem With Bob
By Patrick Clinton
Could it be that someone's finally going to wipe the grin off Smiling Bob's face? As we were putting this issue to bed, the Cincinnati newspapers reported that federal agents had raided the offices of Berkeley Premium Nutraceuticals, a company best known for its "natural male enhancement" pill, Enzyte, and for its repulsive television commercials starring Bob. The US Postal Service led the operation, which also included the FBI, IRS, and FDA. They froze bank accounts, sent employees home, and combed records, attempting to determine whether Berkeley, which has accumulated more than 5,000 complaints with the Cincinnati Better Business Bureau and the Ohio attorney general's office since 2001, had committed mail fraud.
Special Reports
Unleashing the Promise
By Nicole Gray
Recently developed technologies produce clinical quality cells in as few as12 days. Culturing cells in petri dishes can take a month or more.
Phase Six: Regain Confidence
By Patrick Clinton
In a bright airy office above fifth avenue in New York, Lynn O'Connor Vos is talking about topics dear to her heart: trust—and how pharma can regain it—the need to put physicians back in the center of pharmaceutical marketing, and reinvention, a theme in her own life and the core to her approach to business.
World News
Global Report: Generics' New Powerhouse
By Sarah Houlton
Conventional wisdom says that generics businesses are a drain on valuable resources. But these units are much less prone to the disastrous drug safety panics that Big Pharma has recently endured.

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