Pharmaceutical Executive, Jun 1, 2005 - Pharmaceutical Executive

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Pharmaceutical Executive, Jun 1, 2005
Features
When Two Heads are Better
By Jan Malek
R&D leaders face the unenviable choice of either dividing their time between science and operations, or focusing on one to the detriment of the other.
Raising Renaissance Managers
By Ian Wilcox
Pharma companies want to promote their own, rather than hiring senior people away from competitors or other industries. But given the narrow backgrounds of the coming generation, fewer and fewer managers have the coordination and foresight needed to succeed in a general management job.
Who Sees the Halo?
By Doretta Gasorek
Pharma execs and industry analysts say pharma's reputation has improved during the past year. The general public sees things differently. Research says a few select companies are to blame.
Track Patients, Not Prescriptions
By Jeffrey Boschwitz , Joyjit Saha Choudhury , Charley Beever
Even though data can single out physicians with high marketing upsides, most pharma companies are doing without such high-value data.
Chief of Staph
By Sibyl Shalo
A small company with an ambitious goal—to prevent infections instead of treating them after the fact—is about to start a revolution.
Columns
Opinion: Uncle Sam, MD
By Peter J. Pitts
Allowing the private sector to bear both the risk and the reward for successfully developing pharmaceutical, biologic, and medical technology products has been, and remains, the most successful, efficient way to meet our public health goals.
Marketing to Professionals: Dr. Ambassador
By Barry Zimmerman , Brad Fay
As bad news about the industry proliferates, consumers say they rely more than ever on doctors' advice about drug safety. However, the industry rarely uses the role physicians play in shaping its public image.
Leadership: What Have You Learned Today?
By Sander A. Flaum
If you're working your way up, or failing on a regular basis, it makes sense to keep learning and embrace change. But if all is going well, what is your motivation to keep learning and changing as necessary?
Direct to Consumer: Patient-Reported Outcomes
By Michael Parisi
Quality of life symptoms can't be measured in the same way as blood pressure or glucose levels. Therefore, the challenges in interpreting—and then communicating—quality of life improvements are major obstacles in brand communications.
Backpage: Partnering for Vaccine Victories
By Seth Berkley
When G8 leaders meet in early July in Scotland, international health and development will be high on the agenda, and AIDS vaccines likely will be recognized once again as a global priority. Growing political support for AIDS vaccine research is vitally important, but we also know its ultimate impact will be limited unless the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries become more energetically engaged.
Thought Leader: Molecular Stewardship
By Paul Duffy
One of the untold stories behind all these mergers and acquisitions is that a lot of qualified people suddenly become available.
Alternative Media: Shared Appeal
By Bill Tancer
If Pfizer's objective for the NASCAR sponsorship was to reinforce its appeal to rural consumers, the deal was a success. However, if they sought a broader appeal, NASCAR may not be the best partner.
Leadership: The Battle or the Dance?
By Sander A. Flaum , Jonathon Flaum
Eyes in the Back of Your Head
Sales Management: A Sample Plan
By Patrick Burns
There is something called the momentum effect. If a rep leaves a sample today, it will influence the physician to prescribe the drug in the future. This effect is different for every physician and disease class.
Washington Report
Washington Report: "D" Is for Data
By Jill Wechsler
CMS envisions studies to show which drugs keep patients out of hospitals or how certain treatments can reduce side effects. Such analysis would support decisions on best practices in using medications.
Supplements
Building Common Knowledge to Get Results
By Merle Kummer
A leader can reframe a situation. By recognizing that her own perspective may be incomplete, the leader can expand her frame to include more options for action than simply repeating herself.
Dear eDiary
By Phil Lee
Electronic patient-reported outcomes tools let trial sponsors enforce recording deadlines and compliance. They help keep subjects honest.
Tools Are Just the Beginning
By Paul Bleicher
Pharma companies are committed to using electronic data capture in clinical trials. Technology adoption will continue to grow, as FDA and consumers want faster safety data.
Potential for Abuse
By Edward M. Sellers
All too often, abuse liability and dependence potential are afterthoughts in the drug development process.
Untying the Outsourcing Knot
By Jon Koch
Pharma trial sponsors and their CROs should enlist the support of high-level executives to make sure designated decision makers are fully confident in their ability to act.
QT Prolongation: Closing in on the Target of Meaningful Data
By Jogin Desai , Sheetal Shetty
A prolonged QT interval creates an electro-physiological environment that is favorable for the development of cardiac arrhythmias.
Protecting Privacy and Encouraging Research
By Philip H. Lebowitz
If a physician wants to use protected healthcare information (PHI) for research purposes, particularly if the PHI is going to be published as part of research results, an authorization or waiver will be required.
Ignorance is No Excuse
By John Serio
State clinical trials requirements are in place to protect people from being exploited, or unsafely exposed to compounds. Forty years later, it's easy to say, "How did this happen?"
Special Reports
Turn the Page
By Joanna Breitstein
When Jim Dougherty joined Mcgraw-Hill almost 30 years ago, medical journal publishing was just plain different than it is today. The days of the "three-martini lunch" were slowly coming to an end. Yet many companies still determined their ad schedules based on relationships. There was also less competition: without DTC or the Internet, journals garnered larger percentages of pharma's marketing mix. Today, Dougherty is group vice president of McGraw-Hill Healthcare Information and president of the Association of Medical Publications (AMP), an organization of publishing firms in the medical field. Like many of his peers, Dougherty has witnessed—and continues to witness—the transformation of the field. The future is bright, he says, but most certainly uncertain.
From the Editor
Risk: The Series
By Patrick Clinton
Part of the value of a drug comes from the supply chain that protects its integrity. There's a similar supply chain that preserves the value of drug information. And it needs help.

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