Pharmaceutical Executive, Jul 1, 2005 - Pharmaceutical Executive

ADVERTISEMENT

Pharmaceutical Executive, Jul 1, 2005
Columns
Up in Smoke
By Sarah Wealleans
Accept distortions and untruths. Don't try to undo them. The point is not to win an argument; your critics' views are legitimate, irreversible realities. It's time to give the public something new to think about.
Leadership: Not Braver. . . Boulder
By Sander A. Flaum
We all remember the Greek myth about old King Sisyphus. In life, he was a trickster, but the gods got the last laugh in the afterlife by making it his fate to push a huge boulder up a mountain only to see it roll down just before reaching the summit—again and again for all eternity.
Washington Report: The e-Bandwagon
By Jill Wechsler
Pharma companies believe that they can compete in an e-prescribing environment if information systems permit full disclosure and allow doctors to create bookmarks that link easily to information they want.
Global Report: Still Waiting
By Sarah Houlton
Traders say parallel distribution of drugs generates savings for patients. Industry says it creates more profits for traders, leaving pharma with less R&D funding.
Thought Leader: Getting "Sirius" About Specialty
By Garry Barnes
Garry Barnes says he joined the pharma industry for job security—but don't believe him. During the last 25 years, Barnes has worked for four pharma companies and built five sales forces in therapeutic areas ranging from contraception to organ transplantation.
Legal Forum: Loss Causation
By Pamela S. Palmer , Jeff G. Hammel
Plantiffs did not try to establish a link between the purported misconduct and the decline in share price. Rather, their sole allegation was that they had paid artificially inflated prices for Dura securities.
Sales Management: Pay-for-Performance
By Mark A. Stiffler
After the merger, Wyeth had dozens of incentive plans for several thousand employees.
Marketing to Professionals: Shaping the Future of Medicare
By Q&A: Bryan R. Luce
The cost of healthcare has become so great that it's important to review the evidence to determine whether the drug is a good value for the money. Yet, pharmacoeconomics is rarely included in the decision process.
Direct to Consumer: Moving House
By Ken Dec
These are demanding times for pharmaceutical marketers.
Alternative Media: The Health Portal Race
By Debrianna Obara
The race among health information portals may result in better content offerings for consumers. Advertisers that move first have the opportunity to buy out targeted inventory at a good rate.
Special Reports
What Pharma Wants From IT Today
By Ellen H. Julian
Pilot projects involving RFID technology are appearing at some major pharma companies. But uptake of RFID-based solutions remains limited due to concerns about accuracy, reliability, and ROI.
TOC
TOC
What Pharma Wants From IT Today
Features
The Single Source of Truth
By Patrick Clinton
For pharma companies large and small, one of the most pressing challenges of the next few years will be to understand compliance at a much deeper level, to obtain the tools to make it possible.
In Search of the Holy Grail
By Rob Case
Procter & Gamble Pharmaceuticals discovered that a network resulting from even a modest integration offered benefits that exceeded the sum of its parts.
Shedding Wings
By Q&A: John Hagel III
It's an open question whether a pharmaceutical company really needs to have the drug testing process inside its corporate walls, or whether they really should be focusing much more on building effective relationships, in terms of building awareness and acceptance of their products, with both the physicians and end consumers.
Informatics Rules
By MaryJo Zaborowski , Juergen Hammer , Gloria Lawler
Without common reporting standards in place, researchers have little incentive to share data with scientists elsewhere in the company. When researchers don't sharedata on a regular basis, they can begin to feel proprietary about their work—and even less inclined to disclose their results.
Informatics Rules
By MaryJo Zaborowski , Juergen Hammer , Gloria Lawler
Without common reporting standards in place, researchers have little incentive to share data with scientists elsewhere in the company. When researchers don't sharedata on a regular basis, they can begin to feel proprietary about their work—and even less inclined to disclose their results.
From the Editor
Playing Doctor
By Patrick Clinton
If congressmen gathered to work through the nuances of banning ED drugs from reimbursement under Medicare, they'd still back the ban. But the decision would be grounded in lack of faith in prescribing behavior, not disregard for a debilitating condition.
Playing Doctor
By Patrick Clinton
If congressmen gathered to work through the nuances of banning ED drugs from reimbursement under Medicare, they'd still back the ban. But the decision would be grounded in lack of faith in prescribing behavior, not disregard for a debilitating condition.

ADVERTISEMENT

Click here