Strategy

Apr 01, 2007
Pharmaceutical Executive
When Meryl Zausner was 25 and working at Colgate Palmolive, she had the kind of moment so many women in business have. She was attending a planning meeting for a laundry detergent product—the only woman in the room—when a thought occurred to her. "I asked, 'Excuse me, have any of you ever done a load of laundry?'" Zausner recalls. "It turned out that not one of them had, and yet here they were, deciding on the global strategy for how women are going to do laundry."
Mar 01, 2007
Pharmaceutical Executive
When Pfizer CEO Jeffrey Kindler took the podium in January and announced that the struggling company would scale back and restructure its operations, he did more than just signal the end of an era. He proved that to turn around Pfizer—and in a way, the industry at large—companies need to hack away the parts that just aren't working anymore.
Mar 01, 2007
Pharmaceutical Executive
Big, bold, and brash, Frank Baldino has built Cephalon into one of the nation's most dynamic biotechs. The company, based in suburban Philadelphia, is 20-years-old this year, and is already marking its birthday with a flurry of honors. In January, Cephalon was inducted into the World Economic Forum's Community of Global Growth Companies—a tribute to a 44 percent increase in annual revenue (to $1.67 billion in 2006) and its new footprints in Europe and Asia.
Feb 01, 2007
Pharmaceutical Executive
It's a funny law of nature: 20 percent of the clouds produce 80 percent of the rain. And 20 percent of the people do 80 percent of the work. OK, leader, what do you plan to do about it?
Feb 01, 2007
Pharmaceutical Executive
By Pharmaceutical Executive Editors
One mystery of human nature is why so many patients can't seem to take their pills properly. What's not in question is the size or seriousness of the problem. Half of all folks in the developed world who have a chronic disease don't follow their medication's dosing, scheduling, or other requirements. On top of the estimated 500 million prescriptions a year that go unfilled, another 500 million are not taken correctly. A mountain of studies have confirmed noncompliance's negative effects on everything from drug effectiveness and patient mortality to healthcare costs and pharma revenues. The World Health Organization has stamped nonadherence "a worldwide problem of striking magnitude."
Feb 01, 2007
Pharmaceutical Executive
By Pharmaceutical Executive Editors
Gardasil embodies the kind of links between science, commercialization, and humanity that typify great pharma breakthroughs. It turned a medical success story into a campaign of empowerment. Merck used visionary science to produce a vaccine with the potential to eradicate the third-most-common cause of cancer worldwide, and taught girls how to talk about sensitive issues.
Jan 01, 2007
Pharmaceutical Executive
I've been shocked that physicians haven't rebelled in unison against legislators and academics, at Harvard in particular, and fought back against those who have berated the integrity and ethics of the medical community. Is there anyone who seriously thinks a doctor will write one brand over another because of a ball point pen or a pad of paper?
Dec 01, 2006
Pharmaceutical Executive
People are up to a thousand times more worried about involuntary risks (living by a cell phone tower) than they are about voluntary ones (using a cell phone). And they see pharma products as involuntary risks.
Dec 01, 2006
Pharmaceutical Executive
By Pharmaceutical Executive Editors
It's important that the new class and Galvus successfully replace TZDs and sulfonylureas first, then outperform our competitor second. But in the end, we still want to be the leader.
Nov 01, 2006
Pharmaceutical Executive
When Arthur Higgins first announced that he was about to take the reins of the healthcare group at Bayer, in 2004, colleagues were surprised.
native1_300x100
lorem ipsum