Strategy

Feb 01, 2007
Pharmaceutical Executive
By Pharmaceutical Executive Editors
Gardasil embodies the kind of links between science, commercialization, and humanity that typify great pharma breakthroughs. It turned a medical success story into a campaign of empowerment. Merck used visionary science to produce a vaccine with the potential to eradicate the third-most-common cause of cancer worldwide, and taught girls how to talk about sensitive issues.
Jan 01, 2007
Pharmaceutical Executive
I've been shocked that physicians haven't rebelled in unison against legislators and academics, at Harvard in particular, and fought back against those who have berated the integrity and ethics of the medical community. Is there anyone who seriously thinks a doctor will write one brand over another because of a ball point pen or a pad of paper?
Dec 01, 2006
Pharmaceutical Executive
People are up to a thousand times more worried about involuntary risks (living by a cell phone tower) than they are about voluntary ones (using a cell phone). And they see pharma products as involuntary risks.
Dec 01, 2006
Pharmaceutical Executive
By Pharmaceutical Executive Editors
It's important that the new class and Galvus successfully replace TZDs and sulfonylureas first, then outperform our competitor second. But in the end, we still want to be the leader.
Nov 01, 2006
Pharmaceutical Executive
When Arthur Higgins first announced that he was about to take the reins of the healthcare group at Bayer, in 2004, colleagues were surprised.
Nov 01, 2006
Pharmaceutical Executive
By Pharmaceutical Executive Editors
The ability to customize small molecules—to make them better, safer, and easier to use—has long been a staple of pharmaceutical development. But until recently, scientists had few options for enhancing biologics. San Diego-based Ambrx wants to change that.
Nov 01, 2006
Pharmaceutical Executive
When novartis had a look at its recent M&A activity, it found something unsettling: 70 percent of the deals it had done between 1996 and 2004 hadn't delivered their expected value to shareholders. Many other Big Pharmas are saddled with the same problem: The traditional pharmaceutical business model, by which prescription drug makers scoop up assets or companies similar to their own, is going nowhere fast.
Oct 01, 2006
Pharmaceutical Executive
By Pharmaceutical Executive Editors
With "launched the world's best-selling drug" on his resume, Rob Scott was ready for his next professional endeavour. The former Pfizer executive is now head of R&D and chief medical officer at AtheroGenics, named for the signature technology that's being used to develop AGI-1067, a cardiovascular anti-inflammatory in late Phase III clinical trials.
Oct 01, 2006
Pharmaceutical Executive
Isr?l makov has adventure in his blood. A fourth-generation Isr?li, he speaks proudly of his great grandmother, who bought and sold wool in Russia until the late 1890s when, at the age of 50, she moved to Palestine, bought a piece of land, and helped found a town in the wilderness. It was the kind of career move that Makov, CEO of Teva Pharmaceuticals, admires and emulates. As a boy, he rode a donkey to work in his father's orchards on the land his great grandmother bought. He attended an agricultural boarding school, started his career in citrus exports and—decades before Teva recruited him—managed Abic, the second-largest pharma company in Isr?l, and founded Interpharm, the country's first biotech company.
Oct 01, 2006
Pharmaceutical Executive
As pharmaceutical markets go, china is a land of opportunity fraught with complex challenges. Potentially the world's largest market for prescription drugs, China is also the fastest growing market among large countries. At the same time, the sprawling system of 17,000 hospitals—the most important drug-distribution channel in China—is fragmented and encumbered by Byzantine regulations.
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