CDC launches antimicrobial resistance campaign

July 1, 2002

Pharmaceutical Representative

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is launching a campaign aimed at clinicians to prevent antimicrobial resistance in healthcare settings.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is launching a campaign aimed at clinicians to prevent antimicrobial resistance in healthcare settings.

The campaign, entitled "Prevent Antimicrobial Resistance," centers around four key strategies for preventing antimicrobial resistance in healthcare settings: preventing infection, diagnosing and treating infection effectively, using antimicrobials wisely, and preventing transmission of drug-resistant pathogens. Within these strategies are 12 specific action steps, derived from evidence-based guidelines and recommendations already developed by the CDC and other organizations, that clinicians can take now to prevent antimicrobial resistance in hospitalized adults. In the future, the CDC will announce similar action steps for clinicians who care for dialysis patients, emergency room patients, obstetrical patients, critical care patients, patients in long-term care facilities and pediatric patients.

"Clinicians are always on the go and are bombarded with lots of information about preventing infections," said Julie Gerberding, director of the CDC's program to promote healthcare quality. "CDC is trying to simplify things by presenting the best practices in simple terms that easily can be recalled and followed by fronting clinicians to protect patients and prevent antimicrobial resistance."

Campaign partners

The CDC is partnering with professional medical organizations, including the Alexandria, VA-based Infectious Diseases Society of America, the Washington-based American Society for Microbiology, the Bethesda, MD-based National Foundation for Infectious Diseases, national medical centers and other healthcare institutions, to distribute, implement and evaluate campaign materials. Some of the materials being developed include a slide set, posters, brochures and a pocket-size clinician reminder card. The campaign also features a Web site where clinicians may access the 12 action steps and information to share with patients. PR

Related Content:

News