Consumers respond to DTC advertising

August 1, 2002

Pharmaceutical Representative

One out of four consumers reported that direct-to-consumer advertising prompted them to call or visit their doctor to discuss the prescription drug they saw advertised.

One out of four consumers reported that direct-to-consumer advertising prompted them to call or visit their doctor to discuss the prescription drug they saw advertised, according to a study conducted by Uniondale, NY-based marketing research firm Ipsos-NPD.

"The consumers confirmed that direct-to-consumer advertising gives them information to take better control of their personal healthcare," said Fariba Zamaniyan, director and spokesperson for Ipsos.

The study also found that:


•Â Twenty-five percent of respondents stated that direct-to-consumer advertising educated them on alternate drug options for their condition.


•Â Fifteen percent of respondents stated that DTC advertising prompted them to request the prescription drug they saw advertised.


•Â Six percent of respondents were prompted to switch from a current drug therapy to a different drug they saw advertised.

Rx reminders

Just over one in ten respondents stated that advertising reminded them to refill a prescription for a drug they are currently taking.

"Advertising can be beneficial not only to drive prescription branded drug awareness to ultimately encourage trial, but also serves as a reminder for patients to comply with their doctor's instructions to fill or refill their prescriptions," Zamaniyan said.

Concluded Zamaniyan: "Consumers are telling us that they like receiving information about their healthcare options. The key to successful prescription advertising is whether or not the ads prompt an action by consumers and generate prescription fulfillment." PR

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