Cross -Training for the Future

September 1, 2004
Sibyl Shalo
Sibyl Shalo

Sibyl Shalo, senior editor, manages the editorial direction and content of Media Mix, Pharmaceutical Executive's marketing and media section. Sibyl's extensive healthcare experience includes writing, editing, media and government relations, medical education, and marketing communications. Her career has taken her from Washington, DC, where she wore many hats at the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill, to her hometown of New York, where she worked as a freelance medical writer and media liaison for leading public relations agencies. She held positions at New York University Medical Center and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center before freelancing with Reuters Health. She made the full-time switch to journalism with Pharmaceutical Executive in September 2000.

Successful Product Manager's Handbook

We've heard some interesting feedback since we published the first volume of this supplement in March. Most important was the fact that many of you used it-and some of our other supplements-as training tools for new product managers or for those aspiring to such positions. With that in mind, we're covering the remainder of the subjects you identified as most pressing in last spring's survey at a more basic level than we usually do.

We've heard some interesting feedback since we published the first volume of this supplement in March. Most important was the fact that many of you used it—and some of our other supplements—as training tools for new product managers or for those aspiring to such positions. With that in mind, we're covering the remainder of the subjects you identified as most pressing in last spring's survey at a more basic level than we usually do.

Sibyl Shalo

Many of the topics discussed in the articles that follow are fundamental to the day-to-day operations of a product management team—budgeting, market research, resource allocation, competitive intelligence, product launches, and branding. But they are also key skills with which anyone, especially if they're in sales, should be familiar. Because as everyone talks about the importance of cross-functional teams and the educational value of interdepartmental communication, it's reasonable to suggest that people in sales should have a better understanding of the way the home office creates budgets and allocates resources. Clinical researchers might feel more at home at a marketing meeting if they learned more about the way competitive intelligence analyses feed into product positioning strategy. And maybe new product managers who are tasked with developing these multidisciplinary teams might find it comforting to know that there are still learning opportunities out there, just for them. —Sibyl Shalo

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