Marketing

Sep 01, 2005
Pharmaceutical Executive
If pharmaceutical companies hope to improve their marketing efficiency, they have to change how they approach their customers. For years, manufacturers have been practicing the "more is better" direct-selling approach to physicians. But research now shows what common sense has long suggested: More has become too much. Education has given way to inundation, clamoring for face time with physicians has led to diminishing sales returns, and relationships with major pharma stakeholders have broken down. Physicians, regulators, consumers, and legislators have come to mistrust manufacturers' motives and integrity. As pharma asks how its marketing strategies have missed the mark, it may discover answers in reinventing something it once relied upon: strong relationships with customers.
Sep 01, 2005
Pharmaceutical Executive
By Pharmaceutical Executive Editors
Companies face a serious pipeline gap, partly because they focus too narrowly on scientific breakthroughs. Stakeholders also value convenient compounds with reduced side effects and fewer doses.
Sep 01, 2005
Pharmaceutical Executive
By Pharmaceutical Executive Editors
The current DTC ads, through their persistent use of the term "doctor," are misleading to the public and keep all other prescribers invisible to patients.
Sep 01, 2005
Pharmaceutical Executive
When rebate strategies are coupled with sales force and DTC spending, it results in "margin-negative" business—that is, sales that bring in less than the marginal cost of selling, promoting, and manufacturing the drug.
Sep 01, 2005
Pharmaceutical Executive
By Pharmaceutical Executive Editors
The pharmaceutical industry depends on good science. So what does it mean when a majority of the US population turns its back on one of the fundamental insights of modern biology?
Sep 01, 2005
Pharmaceutical Executive
Gen Xers are attractive to many managers because they typically have a strong work ethic. Although they are self-reliant, they still desire to be taken seriously and want to be valued by their companies.
Sep 01, 2005
Pharmaceutical Executive
If pharmaceutical companies hope to improve their marketing efficiency, they have to change how they approach their customers. For years, manufacturers have been practicing the "more is better" direct-selling approach to physicians. But research now shows what common sense has long suggested: More has become too much. Education has given way to inundation, clamoring for face time with physicians has led to diminishing sales returns, and relationships with major pharma stakeholders have broken down. Physicians, regulators, consumers, and legislators have come to mistrust manufacturers' motives and integrity. As pharma asks how its marketing strategies have missed the mark, it may discover answers in reinventing something it once relied upon: strong relationships with customers.
Aug 01, 2005
Pharmaceutical Executive
By Pharmaceutical Executive Editors
Elegant positioning strategies often fail when doctors learn that a prescribed product isn't on a patient's managed care formulary.
Aug 01, 2005
Pharmaceutical Executive
As a result of the rapid innovations in drug technology, and the increasing complexities surrounding drugs' safety, cost, and efficacy, the demand for extensive formulary reviews is growing. To keep pace, Pharmacy & Therapeutics (P&T) committees have been ardently reviewing medications to determine which ones deserve inclusion and preferred placements in health plans and formularies. While there are many factors that influence the committees' decisions, with some carrying more weight than others, pharmaceutical execs complain that there is no accurate way to predict which drugs will make the cut.
Aug 01, 2005
Pharmaceutical Executive
By Pharmaceutical Executive Editors
The world might seem large but it's actually smaller than ever. The best way to exercise a high level of quality control is to make sure that the campaigns are globalized.
native1_300x100
lorem ipsum