Pharmaceutical Executive-02-01-2003

Features
Pharmaceutical Executive

February 01, 2003

Eighty thousand pharmaceutical reps crowd US waiting rooms vying for the opportunity to see physicians. Meanwhile, managed care companies require contracted physicians to churn through a growing number of patient appointments each day. And regulatory forces have removed from the marketer's toolbox many effective tactics for gaining access to doctors outside their offices. With less physician face time available, stiffer competition for each moment, and tight restrictions on access, pharma marketers find themselves hamstrung in their efforts to move product and meet aggressive sales goals.

Features
Pharmaceutical Executive

February 01, 2003

I received a letter recently from an AARP member in Carrolton, Kentucky, who wrote: ?Medicare will not help seniors with medicine costs. My husband?s a diabetic, has had two heart surgeries and asthma since childhood. He is 68 years old. I am 65 and have congestive heart failure and a lung disease. We have to spend so much on medicine, we barely live?can?t go anywhere except to the doctors and grocery. Please help people like us.?

Executive Profile
Pharmaceutical Executive

February 01, 2003

Tne product still in naming, a potential Big Pharma partner, and a foothold field force in North America-those were the works in progress when we toured Eisai Co.'s headquarters and operations in Japan a few years ago.

Features
Pharmaceutical Executive

February 01, 2003

A decade ago, pharma companies typically launched new products, observed how well they sold, and, if necessary, modified their marketing strategy and launched again. In today's competitive marketplace, there is only one rule: Get it right the first time.

Pharmaceutical Executive

February 01, 2003

Table of Contents

Pharmaceutical Executive

February 01, 2003

We all feast from the same kettle-and this season, we're not just feasting; we're swimming in a war-fired stew of events and issues.

Features
Pharmaceutical Executive

February 01, 2003

The historic divide between academic research and the pharmaceutical industry is disappearing as new research collaborations, drug discovery programs, partnerships, and an evolution in attitudes erases the distinctions that have kept the two at arm's length.