Patients mum on Rx use

June 1, 1999

Pharmaceutical Representative

More than one-third of patients do not tell their physicians all of the prescription and over-the-counter medications that they are taking.

More than one-third of patients do not tell their physicians all of the prescription and over-the-counter medications that they are taking, according to a recent survey sponsored by Milwaukee-based Schwarz Pharma.

In a survey of 1,000 adults, 38% reported that they did not always give their physicians a complete list of all medications taken. And although more women (70%) than men (53%) informed their doctor of their medications, and the quality of patient-physician communication improved with the patient's age, 58% of all adults who reported taking prescription medication reported minor side effects, such as dizziness, nausea or shortness of breath.

"Some incidence of side effects with any prescription or even over-the-counter medication is inherent," said Klaus Veitinger, president of Schwarz Pharma. "The more important issue…is the potential for adverse interaction resulting in side effects when patients are taking multiple prescription and/or over-the-counter medicines."

The importance of fully disclosing medication regimens increases with a patient's age, as many patients find themselves taking multiple prescription products to combat a variety of age-related afflictions.

Based on its survey results, Schwarz Pharma recommended the following:


• Patients should carry a list of the medications they are taking, both prescription and over-the-counter.


• Patients should make certain the list is included with their medical records and is updated to reflect changes.


• Patients need to ask their physicians and pharmacists about possible side effects and adverse reactions when they are prescribed a new medication.

Schwarz Pharma also recommended that patients, physicians and pharmacists carefully read product literature. PR

Related Content:

News