Parke-Davis campaign supports patients with diabetes

August 1, 1997

Pharmaceutical Representative

Parke-Davis, Morris Plains, NJ, has responded to a grim survey of patients with diabetes by launching a nationwide campaign to encourage hope and improve health in patients with type II diabetes.

Parke-Davis, Morris Plains, NJ, has responded to a grim survey of patients with diabetes by launching a nationwide campaign to encourage hope and improve health in patients with type II diabetes.

The survey, conducted by Roper Starch Worldwide, New York, revealed that a third of patients with type II diabetes feel discouraged about their ability to manage the disease.

The company spoke with 503 diabetics who were age 35 or older.

When patients can no longer control their diabetes with diet and exercise, they must turn to oral medications and insulin. As a result, they experience feelings of defeat. Patients' self-assessments of their ability to "win the fight" diminished as their therapies changed: 61% of patients on diet and exercise therapy felt they could conquer the disease, while only 48% of patients on oral medication and 47% of patients on insulin said the same.

The survey found that patients who rely on insulin are the most discouraged.

More than 25% of patients on insulin therapy say diabetes has interfered with their career, compared with 10% of those on diet therapy. And among patients who are not working, 41% of those on insulin and 33% of those on oral therapies say they are retired because of disability.

Improving health, hope

"These statistics tell us that health care practitioners should consider the psychological impact of changing therapies, especially when insulin is introduced," said Leo Frangipane, M.D., a consultant for Parke-Davis.

Frangipane and Frank Maguire, both motivational speakers, will join singer Gladys Knight in spearheading Parke-Davis's campaign. Knight's mother, brother and cousin have type II diabetes.

Parke-Davis is launching the campaign to complement its medicine Rezulin™ (troglitazone), which can improve glycemic control and reduce insulin resistance in patients taking insulin.

Another purpose of Parke-Davis' campaign is to remind patients to keep their spirits high. It should find a receptive audience: 78% of surveyed patients report confidence that progress is being made in diabetes research, 87% are optimistic about new drugs that will improve their quality of life, and more than 53% expect to see a cure in their lifetime. PR

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