Pharmaceutical Executive-06-01-2004

Pharmaceutical Executive

June 01, 2004

June 2004 Table of Contents

Pharmaceutical Executive
Features

June 01, 2004

Our industry can succeed only by collaborations," a biotech CEO recently told Pharm Exec, "because no company has the whole of the jigsaw complete -- only a piece." Clearly many of his pharma counterparts agree. The web of alliances formed by the top two dozen biotech and pharma companies from 1973 to 2001 -- at least the 12,500 contracts made public by these firms -- is as tightly knit as a linen shirt.

Pharmaceutical Executive
Features

June 01, 2004

What are the industry's current hiring needs? What functions are most challenging to retain? How do misconceptions about working in pharma affect recruiting? These were some of the questions raised at an exclusive roundtable on pharma industry recruiting, co-sponsored by Pharmaceutical Executive and the New York Times Job Market.

Pharmaceutical Executive
Features

June 01, 2004

Orchestra conductors may, at first, seem like an unlikely comparison for pharma marketers. After all, a conductor's job is to ensure that each instrument harmonizes with others within the section; that all the sections complement one another; and that the timing, tone, and pitch of each disparate part are flawlessly executed. But when one appreciates the challenges facing executives today in integrating all components into the marketing mix, the analogy seems appropriate.

Pharmaceutical Executive
Features

June 01, 2004

Biologics and specialty pharmaceuticals, which typically target small patient populations, have historically necessitated a high per-patient cost to justify their R&D investment and expensive manufacturing and packaging processes.